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Fravia Search challenge

babar0ga
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Post by babar0ga »

Any progress on this? I spent few hours looking for this one but nothing...
Silkut
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Post by Silkut »

babar0ga wrote:Any progress on this? I spent few hours looking for this one but nothing...
You mean on the latest +F's riddle ? Actually there is quite a lot of hints on the Seeker's msgboard. I did not found it though.
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babar0ga
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Post by babar0ga »

Yes, i saw those hints. Also, nothing here.

It's hard...
Silkut
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Post by Silkut »

Hmm as said in the challenge announcement, we should try to focus on the right part of the painting, because looking for paintings from the possible authors from this specific art movement (hopefully quite easy to situate in the time) is not an easy task, I start to think about someone inspirated by les maîtres en la matière.
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Post by Woodmann »

I still have not found it.
I have found many that are close.

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Post by Kayaker »

I'm certainly no art connoisseur, but on first impression (no pun intended), it doesn't strike me as Eugene Boudin's work as was suggested, though the subject matter and style are certainly similar.

Two things in particular, most of his paintings online seem "darker" than the search challenge image. Even when he uses the bright yellows, reds and blues, the sea and sky always look more brooding and ominous.

Second is that his faces almost never have any detail, sometimes completely lacking facial features entirely. Whereas the kids at least in the search picture have eyes, ears and noses.

The challenge image just seems sharper and bolder, there are clear outlines and the figures stand out individually when compared to many of Boudin's paintings, where you generally see a mass of humanity all kind of softly blended together.

But what do I know, I'm just talking out of my ass, don't think I've ever been to an art gallery in my life and normally wouldn't give such a painting a second look.

But from a reversers perspective where everything should be viewed with suspicion,.. it just don't look right to be Boudin. Art Zen?

It wouldn't surprise me if the missing part the ladies are looking at with a spyglass is a ship like the children are playing with..
JMI
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Post by JMI »

I had that same thought. And of course, one of the hints was "what they were looking at."

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JMI
Silkut
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Post by Silkut »

Thou art right Kayaker, the lack of details on faces also eliminates Berthe Morisot. I started from Monet's paintings and looked at his master and the people he inspirated. Am I the only one to find a land on the (middle right corner) horizon ?
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Post by JMI »

Pure speculation here, but I was "assuming" that they would be watching a departing ship, more than likely carrying someone of significance to the woman (women) and children, who are playing with such a ship.

I haven't found it either yet, but time has been limited for serious searching. Now I wish I had taken some Art classes in college. ;)

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Post by Woodmann »

What strikes me as odd is that someone would paint such a thing with the women looking at something but not show what they are looking at.

I would be very surprised if the painting was from a "master".
Since I have looked at virtually everyone who is a "name" as an impressionist, I think searching by a name will be futile.

Here are some of the keywords I have used, maybe someone can use them.

Sea, ocean, beach, seaside, seashore, waters edge, shore, victorian, women, children, kids, holiday

Lets figure this out together. Post your search words .

Woodmann
JMI
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Post by JMI »

Woody:

Under the Rules on the Search page, as Item # 3, it states:

The image pp_002.jpeg, published below, has been cropped on the right side (the signature of the painter was there), one wonders what the two ladies are looking at...

I took this as a suggestion that what they were looking at might also have been cropped, but, again, that is speculation from what was said. However, as you noted, it would be somewhat unusual to show subjects looking off into the distance, particularily with "glasses" of some type, without at least some hint of what they might be looking at, unless, perhaps the name of the painting would somehow identify what the "missing" object might be.

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Post by Woodmann »

OK then........

We need to come up with some search words that will help us with what is missing IE;

Boat, ship, storm etc;

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Post by Kayaker »

It looks like the toy ship might be a French mutin cutter.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_ship_Mutin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cutter_(ship)


On a related and weird note...

"I need a name of the artist"

I say old chap(ette), that's just not cricket, wot?..

http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk/artfor ... opic/89040
babar0ga
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Post by babar0ga »

After some googling and founding nothing i've decided to read a little about art of painting.
It seems that techiques used on this one are impasto and or sfumato.

I used those terms but still nothing...
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Post by TBone »

Ah! Thank you, babar0ga! Impasto. The first thing I noticed about this painting was that the paint was laid on very thickly with broad brush-strokes. Possibly with a paint knife, instead. I'm not enough of an art aficionado to know what that was called. I don't really see much in the way of sfumato in this painting, though.
Kayaker wrote:I'm certainly no art connoisseur, but on first impression (no pun intended), it doesn't strike me as Eugene Boudin's work as was suggested, though the subject matter and style are certainly similar.
I agree. Boudin fits the bill for the general style, but the Devil's in the details. As you pointed out, Boudin's figures are usually vague and featureless. Another thing I noticed is that the painter of this work tends to outline his figures and other elements with a thin black line]post[/i]-impressionsim. Here are a few descriptions I gleaned from the web:
Post-Impressionists continued using vivid colours, thick application of paint, distinctive brushstrokes and real-life subject matter, but they were more inclined to emphasize geometric forms, to distort form for expressive effect, and to use unnatural or arbitrary colour.
Post-Impressionism follows Impressionism. The artists involved were influenced by Impressionism although their work shares few similarities. Disinterested in recording light and color phenomena, Post-Impressionism is characterized by bright color, sharp, often outlined edges.
These descriptions fit the painting to a tee. The paint is thick, brush-strokes are disctinctive, and the colors are vivid (like the very red parasol and girls jacket, as well as the skin tones that are almost yellow or orange. The figures are composed of geometric areas which are nearly flat and of a single color, usually divided by one another by a deliberately outlined edge.

This would place the work in the late 19th century. This seems a better fit (to me) for the clothing, as well. They look less Victorian and more early 20th century to me, but I'm certainly no expert.

As for the location, I think there are several hints that painter is French. The toy ship does resemble a Mutin pretty closely. As well, a poster on the searchlores board suggested that the kneeling boy's hat was a traditional French naval design, the name of which I've already forgotten. I also think that +Fravia's comment about "sipping a nice glass of wine" might have also been a prod in that direction. France and Italy are probably the two countries most closely associated with wine making. Of the two, France is certainly tied more closely to Impressionism, while as far as I can tell, there were very few Italian (post)impressionists.

I'm reasonably sure that the artist is a fairly obscure one. For one thing, this wouldn't be much of a challenge had he chosen a Monet, or Pissarro. But more importantly, +Fravia states that not just "a part" or a "tiny part", but only a "very tiny part" of readers would recognize the image.

I haven't had any luck tracking it down, myself, but I think maybe I have a little more to go on.

I tried searching based on some specific elements of the painting, and I can offer this advice: don't try looking for the distinctive "red parasol". Unfortunately, there's another fairly well-known impressionist painting by that title (a Pissarro, I think) which completely jacks up the signal-to-noise ratio for that token.
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