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Thread: Ever heard of Windows Protection Plus??

  1. #1
    corus-corvax
    Guest

    Ever heard of Windows Protection Plus??

    This guy who's been in the business for over 20 years apparently wrote a pretty tough protection, but it's hard to find. Has anyone here run across it?
    I promise that I have read the FAQ and tried to use the Search to answer my question.

  2. #2
    You need to be more specific. There are several products which use this name. See:

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&q=Windows+Protection+Plus

    Any idea which one YOU are talking about????

    Regards,
    JMI

  3. #3
    corus-corvax
    Guest
    Written by Henry Roberts, and try the search with quotes, since it is an actual product name, often abbreviated 'WPP'

    Other than that, I *don't* have any idea what I'm talking about... ever.... ;-)
    I promise that I have read the FAQ and tried to use the Search to answer my question.

  4. #4
    reknihT esreveR SiGiNT's Avatar
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    Here's your info -

    http://www.nalpeiron.com/whyus/testimonials-3.asp

    SiGiNT
    Last edited by SiGiNT; October 3rd, 2005 at 21:39.
    Unemployed old fart Geek - Self Employed Annoyance
    Team: Noobisco Crackers
    If someone can't do it for you, you'll never learn!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by sigint33
    Here's your info -

    http://www.nalpeiron.com/whyus/testimonials-3.asp

    SiGiNT
    I've inspected that site, and I maybe overly optimistic, but I think I already found the weakness of that protection system (software version, not the hardware dongle). The licensing information must be stored somewhere. They claim that it does not store it in the registry, nor on files on the disk, nor does it require an Internet connection. What other places can small amounts of data be kept in a non-volatile manner? I can think of two right now, one of them being reserved sectii on the hard disk and the other in the various configuration flash memories in various devices. Hardware has some undocumented "features", but those features eventually surface due to their discovery in esoteric applications such as this. They claim it is immune to hard-disk imaging, and most likely it uses serial numbers of various components of the system (standard practice) in order to do so. They also claim the license information is stored in an area "outside the access of the user". Very interesting.

    Finally, this is the part where I have to actually laugh at their implementation:
    Technical overview
    The PRO-Tector™ API is provided as Windows Dynamic Link Libraries.

    Any Window programming language capable of calling a standard Windows DLL can work with the PRO-Tector™ API. The PRO-Tector™ SDK provides direct support for Visual C++, Visual Basic, .NET and Delphi with API interfaces and API classes.
    That's all? Spoof the DLL and you're done. Here's something else interesting:
    Whenever your application runs it calls PRO-Tector™ to check whether the application is licensed on that machine; it does this by passing the application's unique Product ID to PRO-Tector™ for checking against the License Data. If this validation is successful your application runs normally, if unsuccessful your application can either exit or continue running in demo/evaluation mode.
    Look who makes the ultimate decision. (Underlined portion).
    Unlike all other comparable products PRO-Tector™ does NOT work from a “machine fingerprint” made up of data from part of the users PC such as a MAC Address, CPU number etc, it stores the license data from the machine outside the read/write area on the HDD thus avoiding two key issues when the average user ‘lives’ with a PC i.e. the user can’t edit or lose the license and they can make as many upgrade changes to their PC as they like.
    Ok... no machine ID... one less thing to worry about. But then how does that data get put there and how is it read? There must be a way! Too bad they don't give a downloadable demo to experiment with

    Somewhere on that site I believe it said that their protection DLL was written with C++. Not even Asm.

    Most of that site is just exaggerated advertising. "Our products have never been "cracked" in 22 years (Since 1983)" but is that really true? Perhaps noone wants to because the amount of software protected with it is very small. But reading through the site really makes me want to crack it. It's as if they're inviting us to. Any prizes to the first one who can crack it?

  6. #6

    As Above...

    A clear "evolution" of the techniques used by the software "Goldsim" (a high end simulation software). This may be useful for people who seek "historical" or "embryonic" timelines...

    Have Phun
    Blame Microsoft, get l337 !!

  7. #7
    corus-corvax
    Guest
    I don't quite understand what you mean by either of these sentences. Would you please explain?
    I promise that I have read the FAQ and tried to use the Search to answer my question.

  8. #8
    corus-corvax
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by LLXX
    Somewhere on that site I believe it said that their protection DLL was written with C++. Not even Asm.
    One good thing about this is the compiler often serves to obfuscate the code with less work than trying to do so directly in asm, right?
    I promise that I have read the FAQ and tried to use the Search to answer my question.

  9. #9

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by corus-corvax
    This guy who's been in the business for over 20 years apparently wrote a pretty tough protection, but it's hard to find. Has anyone here run across it?
    And now grab a good dictionary and find out about the difference between aging and ripening
    Double the killers!

  10. #10
    wHack
    Guest
    it doesn't work on virtual machines. If you try and install and run an app protected with it on a virtual PC environment the app will fail. TI-Nspire CAS by texas instruments is protected with it and it won't run under a Virtual PC 2007 install of XP.

    Gosh this thread was old hope someone didn't already post this.
    Last edited by wHack; January 15th, 2008 at 17:18.
    I promise that I have read the FAQ and tried to use the Search to answer my question.

  11. #11
    Well Duh! Let's see ... won't run under "virtual machine." What could cause that....Hum.... Do you suppose it might "detect" you are attempting to run it in a "virtual machine"????? And did YOU investigate, at all, how that might occur and do ANY searching on THAT issue, or are you just reviving this old Thread because you didn't have anything else to spend your time on???

    Regards,
    JMI

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