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Decompression Libraries


Tool name: bzip2
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Julian Seward                        
Website: http://www.bzip.org
Current version: 1.0.4
Last updated: December 20, 2006
Direct D/L link: N/A
License type: Free / Open Source
Description: bzip2 is a freely available, patent free (see below), high-quality data compressor. It typically compresses files to within 10% to 15% of the best available techniques (the PPM family of statistical compressors), whilst being around twice as fast at compression and six times faster at decompression.

The current version is 1.0.4, released 20 December 2006.

Why would I want to use it?

* Because it compresses well. So it packs more stuff into your overfull disk drives, distribution CDs, backup tapes, Zip disks, etc. And/or it reduces your phone bills, customer download times, long distance network traffic, etc. It's not the world's fastest compressor, but it's still fast enough to be very useful.

* Because it's open-source (BSD-style license), and, as far as I know, patent-free. (To the best of my knowledge. I can't afford to do a full patent search, so I can't guarantee this. Caveat emptor). So you can use it for whatever you like. Naturally, the source code is part of the distribution.

* Because it supports (limited) recovery from media errors. If you are trying to restore compressed data from a backup tape or disk, and that data contains some errors, bzip2 may still be able to decompress those parts of the file which are undamaged.

* Because you already know how to use it. bzip2's command line flags are similar to those of GNU Gzip, so if you know how to use gzip, you know how to use bzip2.

* Because it's very portable. It should run on any 32 or 64-bit machine with an ANSI C compiler. The distribution should compile unmodified on Unix and Win32 systems. Earlier versions have been ported with little difficulty to a large number of weird and wonderful systems.

* Because (by now, late 2006) everybody else uses it too.

The code is organised as a library with a programming interface. The bzip2 program itself is a client of the library. You can use the library in your own programs, to directly read and write .bz2 files, or even just to compress data in memory using the bzip2 algorithms.
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Tool name: libarchive
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: kientzle@freebsd.org                        
Website: http://people.freebsd.org/~kientzle/libarchive
Current version: 2.4.11
Last updated: December 30, 2007
Direct D/L link: N/A
License type: Free / Open Source
Description: Libarchive is a programming library that can create and read several different streaming archive formats, including most popular tar variants, several cpio formats, and both BSD and GNU ar variants. It can also write shar archives and read ISO9660 CDROM images and ZIP archives. The bsdtar program is an implementation of tar(1) that is built on top of libarchive. It started as a test harness, but has grown into a feature-competitive replacement for GNU tar. The bsdcpio program is an implementation of cpio(1) that is built on top of libarchive.

The libarchive library offers a number of features that make it both very flexible and very powerful.

* Automatic format detection: libarchive can automatically determine both the compression and the archive format, regardless of the data source. (GNU tar and star only do full format detection when reading from a file, for instance. Gunnar Ritter's heirloom tar also does full automatic format detection.)

* Reads popular formats: libarchive can read GNU tar, ustar, pax interchange format, cpio, zip, and ISO9660 formats. The internal architecture is easily extensible. The only requirement for read support is that all metadata for a file must precede the file data itself within the archive.

* Writes popular formats: libarchive can write ustar, pax interchange format, cpio, and shar formats. The internal architecture is easily extensible. The only requirement for write support is that all metadata for a file must follow the preceding file's data within the archive. (Yes, there are formats that libarchive can write but not read and vice versa.)

* Reads and writes POSIX formats: libarchive reads and writes POSIX-standard formats, including "ustar," "pax interchange format," and the POSIX "cpio" format.

* Supports pax interchange format: Pax interchange format (which, despite the name, is really an extended tar format) eliminates almost all limitations of historic tar formats and provides a standard method for incorporating vendor-specific extensions. libarchive exploits this extension mechanism to support ACLs and file flags, for example. (Joerg Schilling's star archiver and recent versions of GNU tar also support pax interchange format.)

* High-Level API: the libarchive API makes it fairly simple to build an archive from a list of filenames or to extract the entries from an archive. However, the API also provides extreme flexibility with regards to data sources. For example, there are generic hooks that allow you to write an archive to a socket or read data from an archive entry into a memory buffer.

* Modular: The library design carefully minimizes link pollution. If you only need read support for a single format, for example, you will only get the required code. This minimizes the size of statically-linked executables. (In particular, zlib or libbz2 are only required if you specifically request gzip or bzip2 support.)

* Extensible: The internal design uses generic interfaces for compression, archive format detection and decoding, and archive data I/O. It should be very easy to add new formats, new compression methods, or new ways of reading/writing archives.

* Featureful: Libarchive handles ACLs, file flags, extended attributes, international characters, large files, long pathnames, and many other features. Details vary depending on the particular format, of course.

* Fast: Libarchive minimizes data copying when handling archive files and contains carefully-tuned code for recreating objects on disk.
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Tool name: SharpZipLib
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: IC#Code                        
Website: http://www.icsharpcode.net/OpenSource/SharpZipLib/Default.aspx
Current version: 0.85.4
Last updated: September 9, 2007
Direct D/L link: N/A
License type: Free / Open Source
Description: #ziplib (SharpZipLib, formerly NZipLib) is a Zip, GZip, Tar and BZip2 library written entirely in C# for the .NET platform. It is implemented as an assembly (installable in the GAC), and thus can easily be incorporated into other projects (in any .NET language). The creator of #ziplib put it this way: "I've ported the zip library over to C# because I needed gzip/zip compression and I didn't want to use libzip.dll or something like this. I want all in pure C#."
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Tool name: zlib
Rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Author: Jean-loup Gailly & Mark Adler                        
Website: http://zlib.net
Current version: 1.2.8
Last updated: April 28, 2013
Direct D/L link: http://zlib.net/zlib-1.2.8.tar.gz
License type: Freeware / Open Source (C)
Description: zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW can double or triple the file size in extreme cases.) zlib's memory footprint is also independent of the input data and can be reduced, if necessary, at some cost in compression. A more precise, technical discussion of both points is available on another page.

zlib was written by Jean-loup Gailly (compression) and Mark Adler (decompression). Jean-loup is also the primary author/maintainer of gzip(1), the author of the comp.compression FAQ list and the former maintainer of Info-ZIP's Zip; Mark is also the author of gzip's and UnZip's main decompression routines and was the original author of Zip. Not surprisingly, the compression algorithm used in zlib is essentially the same as that in gzip and Zip, namely, the `deflate' method that originated in PKWARE's PKZIP 2.x.
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